My Advice to the Future Generation Is…

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What I Know

“My advice to the future generation is to sprint towards the things you are passionate about, regardless of other people’s opinions. Maintain your enthusiasm in all your efforts and be prepared to pivot when opportunity rises up.” —Joshua Evans, founder of the company Enthusiastic You!

“Steve Jobs—truth be told—was only strong at a few things (mega-strong) and was very wise to always surround himself with people that could see and do things he couldn’t.”

“Recognize and appreciate what the older generations have done for LGBT rights and equality. It’s easy to become complacent because now most Americans can come out in high school, but it wasn’t always like that. The older generations paved the way for today’s wider LGBT recognition: Gathering places were often raided, and LGBTs jailed. Being gay was considered a disease until the 1970s, and marriage equality, workplace rights and more [were uncommon]. We all need to understand our history and diligently work to make sure we never go back to the dark days for our community. Along parallel lines, find out about LGBT rights (or lack thereof) in many other parts of the world, where being LGBT is criminalized and, in some cases, punishable by death. Even though we are fortunate to be living in better times in the U.S. and several other countries, our brothers and sisters in a huge part of the world don’t have it so good. Work for equality at home and around the world.” —Thomas Roth, MBA, president, Community Marketing & Insights

“It is critical to understand what you are strong at—and what your weaknesses are—and surround yourself with people that fill in your skill and knowledge gaps. No one climbed Mount Everest alone. Most people do great things by climbing on the shoulder of giants. Steve Jobs—truth be told—was only strong at a few things (mega-strong) and was very wise to always surround himself with people that could see and do things he couldn’t. Yes, he always led, but he never created the iPhone, iPad and iPod himself. And he was the first to admit it.” —Shane Cragun, founding principal and CEO of SweetmanCragun

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