What Meeting Planners Should Know About Human Trafficking

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events, human trafficking
Human trafficking takes place in 4- and 5-star hotels, including the ones planners use.

What does human trafficking have to do with meeting planning? Everything. Here are four ways in which the two worlds intersect:

1) Trafficking happens all the time in 4- and 5-star hotels. Subway spokesperson Jared Fogle made headlines when he was arrested for child prostitution at The Plaza in New York City. The largest-ever FBI sting last October led to 150 arrests in one week (and saved 150 children) in the same cities—and hotels—we all meet in.

2) Traffickers move victims across cities and countries using air and ground transportation companies. If you think you spotted something when you were on a business trip, you probably did.

3) Meeting planners can bring up the subject in casual conversation with their hotel director of sales or GM, asking what policies and procedures the hotel has in place around human trafficking. Once they realize there isn’t a big financial burden, they’re more apt to take steps. Other planners build language right into their RFPs and give preferential treatment to suppliers who educate their employees and guests.

4) Numerous associations, hotel companies and other major players in the meetings industry have signed “The Code” (the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct) in the past year, including most recently Hyatt Hotels Corp., Accor, GBTA, Site and Maritz, forging a commitment to train their employees to spot the signs of child sex slavery.

Visit the ECPAT website for more information and resources.

 

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Barbara Scofidio
Barbara Scofidio is editor of Prevue and heads up the Visionary Summits, our exclusive conference series targeting senior-level meeting and incentive planners. In 25 years of covering the industry, her articles have spanned topics ranging from social media to strategic meetings management. She is currently the media liaison for FICP's Education Committee and was the first member of the media ever to be invited to sit on a committee by GBTA, where she spent three years on the Groups and Meetings Committee. She has also been an active member of Site, chairing its Crystal Awards committee and acting as a judge. A familiar face at industry events, Barbara often leads panel discussions or speaks on topics close to her heart, such as green meetings or how the industry can help combat human trafficking. Barbara is based outside Boston, in Groton, Mass.

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